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mildlyautisticsuperdetectives:

HERE IT IS. THIS IS IT. MY FAVORITE QUOTE FROM COMMUNITY. THIS ONE RIGHT HERE.

(Source: godyoutalkpretty, via erraticserenity)

Tags: community
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Anonymous said: Not every character is going to make the cut. I dont see what the big deal is.

fuckyeahwarriorwomen:

everybodyilovedies:

Okay, so I’m tired and have a headache so I’m not going to respond to this as in depth as I should, but let’s look at some facts:

There were 5 founding Avengers: Tony Stark, Thor, Bruce Banner (Hulk), Hank Pym, and Janet van Dyne (Cap wasn’t one of them, he didn’t show up until issue 4!). Of those 5 founding members, we have Tony Stark: 5 movies, 3 solos; Thor: 4 movies, 2 solos; Bruce Banner: 4 movies, 2 solos; and Hank Pym, 1 movie. Out of those 5 founding members, 1 of them is female. Out of those 5 founding members, 1 of them isn’t getting into a movie at all, much less their own movie.

OH WHOA THOSE TWO OVERLAP FOR SOME REASON?????????

Okay, so, whatever. Not everyone gets their own movie, right? Nevermind that Jan found Captain America, named the Avengers, is the reason Jocasta EXISTS, chairpersoned the team more times than I can honestly remember right now but at least 3 times, is #5 on the most important Marvel heroes list of all time (and would be number 1 if the Avengers voted on it, according to the list makers’ own admission). (Beating out, for the record: Hank Pym (7), Black Widow (10), Vision (6), Luke Cage (12), Beast (13), Quicksilver (14), Falcon (15), Hulk (18), Spider-Man (25), Iron Patriot (31), Havok (36), Ant Man (Scott Long, 46), Iron Fist (46), and Jessica Jones (49) ALL OF WHOM are getting big or small screen treatment before she is. Never mind ALL OF THAT.

They’re making an Ant Man movie, right? So okay, cool, obviously Ant Man is going to be in it. But which one? There’s two! Hank and Scott. Oh, turns out, they’re gonna do both.

So they didn’t cut either Ant Man, they’re shoehorning BOTH of them into one movie. Huh, okay, cool! Both of them made the cut, I guess. Biggest bang for their buck. 

Did you know Cassie Lang is the entire reason Scott Lang (Ant Man #2) became a superhero (criminal at first) in the first place? Like it’s literally his entire origin story.

You know who isn’t making it into the movie at all? Well that’s kinda… weird. I mean, it seems relevant, you know? But hey, I guess not everybody is going to make the cut!

And Jan, right? She doesn’t matter. It’s not like she literally carried Hank through at least 5 breakdowns. It’s not like SHE’S the one who wanted to be a superhero in the first place and encouraged him to use his research for that. It’s not like SHE defeated Ultron HERSELF MULTIPLE TIMES. She’s definitely not relevant at all to Hank’s story. Oh, and even BETTER. Let’s just COMBINE these two women into one woman! Rather than give Hank a wife and partner who can support him, we’ll give him a daughter who… something. And rather than give Scott a daughter who will be his entire origin story, we’ll give him… Hank’s daughter?

Put all of that aside, seriously. Take EVERYTHING I just said and completely disregard it. You know why it’s bullshit Jan got cut? Because she’s a woman who is feminine and also kick butt. She’s a woman who can be ditzy and brilliantly cunning. She’s flighty and carefree while being a strong, commanding leader who wins the respect of everyone who works under her. She loves fashion AND punching bad guys in the face. She thinks being a hero is all fun and games until she learns responsibility and severity, but even then keeps her compassion and empathy. Jan is an important, DIFFERENT role model for men and women alike that the MCU HASN’T SEEN BEFORE. Hank and Scott, sorry to say, are characters WE HAVE SEEN BEFORE. Hank is a scientist who is tortured by his genius but feels the responsibility to do good with it. Been there, done that, bought the neck brace. Scott is a guy down on his luck just trying to hold it together for his family and gets sucked into a life of crime. Pretty sure I just summarized every show that has ever aired on AMC. But you know what Jan is? Jan is a female action star who isn’t either 1.) a prodigy child confused by her own powers, or 2.) a stone-cold ultra killer with the toughness of steel. Not that there’s anything WRONG with those archetypes: what’s wrong is that’s the ONLY TWO you see women satisfying in action movies (besides love interest, of course). 

Full disclosure: out of all the Marvel characters, I’m probably the most like Carol Danvers. But I LOVE JAN because she’s DIFFERENT. I think Jan might even be more important than Carol to get onto the big screen because  she’s not just like one of the guys. She’s not tough in a masculine way. She has a pixie haircut and designs costumes and tries not to break a nail. But she does it while being a BRILLIANT leader and a FIERCE warrior. It’s something we NEED to show on screen. It’s something little girls and little boys NEED to know is possible. I sure would have benefited from it as a kid, at least. 

That’s why you can’t just accept that Jan didn’t make the cut.

I want Janet as Giant Girl from Marvel Adventures.

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temariart:

Ruff and Tuff

temariart:

Ruff and Tuff

(via viria)

Tags: httyd hexterah
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daeranilen:

daeranilen:

Earlier today, I served as the “young woman’s voice” in a panel of local experts at a Girl Scouts speaking event. One question for the panel was something to the effect of, "Should parents read their daughter’s texts or monitor her online activity for bad language and inappropriate content?"

I was surprised when the first panelist answered the question as if it were about cyberbullying. The adult audience nodded sagely as she spoke about the importance of protecting children online.

I reached for the microphone next. I said, “As far as reading your child’s texts or logging into their social media profiles, I would say 99.9% of the time, do not do that.”

Looks of total shock answered me. I actually saw heads jerk back in surprise. Even some of my fellow panelists blinked.

Everyone stared as I explained that going behind a child’s back in such a way severs the bond of trust with the parent. When I said, “This is the most effective way to ensure that your child never tells you anything,” it was like I’d delivered a revelation.

It’s easy to talk about the disconnect between the old and the young, but I don’t think I’d ever been so slapped in the face by the reality of it. It was clear that for most of the parents I spoke to, the idea of such actions as a violation had never occurred to them at all.

It alarms me how quickly adults forget that children are people.

Apparently people are rediscovering this post somehow and I think that’s pretty cool! Having experienced similar violations of trust in my youth, this is an important issue to me, so I want to add my personal story:

Around age 13, I tried to express to my mother that I thought I might have clinical depression, and she snapped at me “not to joke about things like that.” I stopped telling my mother when I felt depressed.

Around age 15, I caught my mother reading my diary. She confessed that any time she saw me write in my diary, she would sneak into my room and read it, because I only wrote when I was upset. I stopped keeping a diary.

Around age 18, I had an emotional breakdown while on vacation because I didn’t want to go to college. I ended up seeing a therapist for - surprise surprise - depression.

Around age 21, I spoke on this panel with my mother in the audience, and afterwards I mentioned the diary incident to her with respect to this particular Q&A. Her eyes welled up, and she said, “You know I read those because I was worried you were depressed and going to hurt yourself, right?”

TL;DR: When you invade your child’s privacy, you communicate three things:

  1. You do not respect their rights as an individual.
  2. You do not trust them to navigate problems or seek help on their own.
  3. You probably haven’t been listening to them.

Information about almost every issue that you think you have to snoop for can probably be obtained by communicating with and listening to your child.

(via barbiejedi)

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(Source: rebelsandrec, via awyeahmrb)

Tags: star wars
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asofteravenger:

rhetorical questions shall continue until morale improves.

asofteravenger:

rhetorical questions shall continue until morale improves.

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asofteravenger:

anyway quit complaining. YOUR kids voted for me

asofteravenger:

anyway quit complaining. YOUR kids voted for me

(via asofteravenger)

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simplypotterheads:

Caroline sent me this in my personal blog, and I just had to share it with all you potterheads:

… If you’re a Harry Potter fan, this is wonderful news. [The study] provides some experimental backing for J.K. Rowling’s opinion that, “The Potter books in general are a prolonged argument for tolerance, a prolonged plea for an end to bigotry.”

More importantly, it shows that conveying messages of tolerance through literature actually works. Potter’s journey of self-discovery, then, might some day be immortalized in projects that aim to teach tolerance to young children.

[x]

(via thetadoctor)

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Anonymous said: Im pretty sad that harley and ivy arent canon lesbians for eachother i mean cOME ON

elphabaforpresidentofgallifrey:

nannairb:

clintbarttons:

they

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are

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so

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canon

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i

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dont

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care

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what

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anyone

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says

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even babs knows

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YOU FORGOT HARLEY’S REACTION TO THAT, ASKING IF SHE MEANS LIKE HOW PEOPLE SAY BATGIRL AND SUPERGIRL ARE FRIENDS

THEN BATGIRL CHANGES THE SUBJECT

SUPER LESBIANS DESERVE THEIR OWN SUPER SHOW

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blacknoonajade:

the-fault-in-my-fandoms:

[commence gross and heartbreaking sobbing]

a small whispered “no.”

(Source: gendry-the-bull, via acutepencil)